Carlops

In 1882-4, Frances Groome’s Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland described Carlops

Carlops, a village in Linton parish, NW Peeblesshire, on the North Esk river, at the boundary with Edinburghshire, 14 miles SSW of Edinburgh, and 2¾ NNE of West Linton. Founded in 1784, it came to be inhabited chiefly by cotton weavers, and now is a centre of traffic for the working of coal and limestone in its neighbourhood, and has a Free church and two inns. Carlops Hill, ¾ mile W by N, rises 1490 feet above sea-level.

Nowadays, cotton weaving, coal working and limestone works are long gone. There is still a church, but just one inn, the Allan Ramsay Hotel. Mostly, Carlops is now a small attractive dormitory settlement although it also boasts a thriving village community hall which hosts film evenings and live play and theatre events, as well as a popular monthly market fair selling local goods and farm produce.

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Allan Ramsay Hotel, Carlops
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Whitewashed cottages beside the A702 trunk road – church on the right.

 

 

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Carlops and A702

Carlops is a small village three miles from West Linton in the Scottish Borders, just outside the boundary with Midlothian.

The village was founded in 1784 and developed cotton weaving, coalmining and limestone mining.

The name derives from “Witches’ Leap” (Scots: ‘Carlins Lowp’) as near the south of the village there are two exposed rock faces about 20 metres in height facing each other with a similar distance between them. Folklore maintained that witches would leap from one face to the other, over the chasm, for entertainment of an evening.

This picture was taken from near the top of Patties Hill on a bitingly cold and windy November day (sometimes I doubt my sanity) and shows Carlops with the A702 trunk road snaking up towards West Linton.

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A veritable forest of signage as you enter Carlops from Midlothian